Proof does Jenga

Half of the Proof Advertising creative floor seems to have an ongoing Jenga game at all times. But this game had gotten out of hand, and it took Sarah to end it all on her last day. It was quite the event.

Video shot by many Proofers (including me), and edited by the talented Bud Hasert, who blew me away when I found out he does crazy-great costume work.

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Miyazaki Month at Alamo Drafthouse

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I’ve seen many Miyazaki films thanks to some friends when I was younger, but I jumped at the chance to see many of these films in theaters when Alamo Drafthouse announced that February is going to be Miyazaki month! I’ll be seeing (again) Spirited Away, Howl’s Moving Castle, and Princess Mononoke. New viewings for me will be My Neighbor Totoro, Kiki’s Delivery Service, Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, and The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness (a documentary about the studio and Miyazaki).

Alamo keeps adding movies and screen times, so maybe there will be more as the month goes on! These are all wonderful movies, and I highly recommend people go see them.

Also, check out the trailer for February; really good use of music and cutting together great parts of many of Studio Ghibli films. Loved seeing it every time in theaters.

Is it too early to be carving pumpkins?

A friend of mine hosted an early pumpkin carving party this week because it’s the best holiday (and these things are already being sold at HEB). Since I only started carving pumpkins a few years ago, I try and make up for lost time and carve something more and more complicated or difficult every year. Last year I did the pony from Kate Beaton’s Hark a Vagrant! webcomic (and Adventure Time, depending on who you ask).

This year I decided to do a daruma doll face. It ended up looking a lot like a grumpy old man, but I’m still quite pleased with how it came out.

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Here’s a group shot of the whole party’s work (I had so many pumpkin seeds to roast!):

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Happy (way, way early) Halloween!

Bo Burnham – Live

1383681_10153336809085434_415673868_nToday, my friend Kelsey and I had the good fortune of seeing Bo Burnham of YouTube fame, live at the Paramount Theater. Bo is the youngest comedian to have a Stand-Up Special on Comedy Central, and for good reason. I’ve been following his work for years, and he’s super, duper, DUPER talented.

The entire show is available on both Netflix and YouTube (he put it up for free!). He’s hilarious (but extremely inappropriate, beware).

We waited in line for about an hour to meet him after the show, and I also got his book of poems signed. And my friend made him laugh (she was very proud). Thanks Bo!

Musings: Music Taste Being A Deal Breaker

FYI: This post has nothing to do (even tangentially) with design. Scroll on down past this wall o’ text.

I may be preaching to the choir, here. Graphic designers as a group are some of the most opinionated people I know concerning music. I have some (admittedly, probably common) theories as to why that is, but that would take up a whole ‘nother blog post.

The debate is this. Should differing tastes in music be a deal breaker in a blossoming relationship?

Today while perusing my Facebook feed, NPR posted the article that got me thinking on this subject (not for the first time). Here is the article in question. Now, I can never resist good, polarizing topics such as these. And even better is the comments section (which usually goes for a good half-hour in a frothy frenzy, then slows down). It was vedy intedesting to see the reactions of NPR’s generally music-savvy followers.

The conclusion that I’ve come to, over my EXTENSIVE 5 years (or so) of dating and relationship experience, is that it can (and should) vary by person, like any other preference in a preferred partner. Many people were stating it was, indeed, a deal breaker. Others were taking issue with this, expressing that such a snap judgement was shallow and superficial, and that other traits were much more important. Still others were very aptly pointing out that this was a “first world problem.” I can agree with that, but still think it can warrant discussion.

Concerts, car rides… music comes up. And I felt the need to point out that it’s not indifference to their taste (say for example, dubstep doesn’t bother you, you could take it or leave it), it’s actively HATING the music they enjoy (for example, commonly polarizing genres like pop, heavy metal, rap or country. Or dubstep.).

If music is very important to you, it’s one of those things you DO care about in a relationship. If music is not so important, then groovy! Terrible pun intended.

Is disliking someone because of the genre of books they read considered shallow, if reading is an important hobby for you? Say, vampire romances, to choose another polarizing (sub) genre. How about grooming and style choices? What if they dress very scantily, and you’re not into that? Say their sense of humor is extremely crude, and you have a more “refined” sense of humor? Or vice versa?

And to approach it from the other side: to you, music is not of much import. Discovering new music is the job of the radio. Top 40 is cool with you. And you start dating someone that insists that you come to concerts with them, you give their favorite band one more listen, they endlessly talk about how they loved a band far before they achieved fame, they make fun of you for your “pedestrian tastes,” (I’m sure we’ve all encountered someone like this in real life or on the internet, dear reader, no matter how varied and eclectic your tastes may be). I could see that destroying a relationship.

I suppose it’s all about extremes.

Music taste in general is one of those things that people automatically label as snobby in general (I’ve avoided the word hipster this entire post, but there you go, I said it)… therefore if it’s something one looks for in a partner, it can be seen as shallow. But we all look for certain surface-level traits in potential partners whether people acknowledge it or not. And yeah, maybe these judgments are all superficial, but those things matter a lot when at least initially looking for a mate. Looking for common ground is what we all do when getting to know someone.

TL;DR Do what you want!

As for my personal take on this… I would like my hypothetical boyfriend to enjoy similar music to my tastes, but I have other interests, so no. Not a deal breaker for me personally.

Webcomics Rampage: 2012

Webcomics Rampage is a small signing and panel discussion for webcomics artists and their fans that they host at a local comics book shop in Austin called Dragon’s Lair. You may remember my post about this event last year.

This year they limited you to one of the three panels, and the “After Dark” one (by far the most amusing from last year’s experience) was full by the time I got around to making the call. We went to the afternoon panel, and also managed to sneak into the After Dark panel by arriving early.

Didn’t make a fool of myself at either of the panels this year. That’s good.

Danielle Corsetto (Girls with Slingshots) and one of the comic shop's very friendly cats.

Danielle Corsetto (Girls with Slingshots) and one of the comic shop’s very friendly cats.

After the hilariously inappropriate (imagine: a bunch of 20-to-30-somethings comic writers in a room together, allowed to say whatever they want) second panel was over, I went and bought the books I was missing from my Girls with Slingshots collection (and had them signed and drawn in). Also got to meet E.K. Weaver, a local graphic designer who also writes a webcomic (be aware that if you go looking for it, it can be NSFW), and purchased her two books as well. Met Zach Weiner of SMBC fame, and my boyfriend completely geeked out all over him, bought some merch, and offered to buy him a drink. He politely declined, saying they had an early morning the next day.

Got one of these shirts for my dad.

Got one of these shirts for my dad.

The webcomics community is a great, relatively new grouping of friendly people. The authors are really down-to-earth, and more than willing to chat with their fans and do not take themselves seriously, even though some have them have become extremely well-known. I’ll be back next year for a third go.